Ready? Check!

Is your text layout properly arranged?

Сlick the corresponding circle if your project meets the requirements

Sometimes strange things happen in paragraphs. If you’re serious about type, you already know that a large part of your typesetting time is spent fixing bad line breaks.

 

These include:

• ‘I’ at the end of lines—it

should be pushed down to the next line. Use the Alt + Space shortcut to insert non-breaking spaces.

• Any repeated words that

stack at line beginnings or endings.

• ‘Pig bristles’—hyphens

occasionally falling at the end of the line. When these anomalies happen, tweak the spacing to shift things around.

Check for awkward word spacing:

• ‘Rivers’—visual gaps that

run down a paragraph.

• Loose lines—individual

lines containing poorly spaced elements.

 

They require manual adjustment: try reworking copy, using non-breaking space (Opt + Space for Mac and Alt + Space for Windows) or tweaking text tracking.

A ‘widow’ is a very short line at the end of a paragraph or column. They’re considered poor typography because widows leave too much white space between paragraphs or at the bottom of a page. This interrupts the reader. ‘Orphans’ are single words or very short lines appearing at the beginning of a column or a page. This results in poor horizontal alignment at the top of the column or page. Fix them by:

• Reworking the rag or

editing the copy.

• Tweak the tracking of the

paragraph or line.

• Adjust the text frame

width to pull short words onto previous lines.

Tracking is another effective method of spatial adjustment, much like kerning, but focused on adjusting space uniformly over a range of characters. Tracking works especially well on headings and subheadings that need to be ultra-legible, affecting the visual density of a word, phrase or paragraph:

• Large text sizes have to be

tracked, always in negative values, because the space between letters gets bigger as the text grows.

• Tracking in positive values

is useful when you want to emphasize words and is commonly used for capitalized text.

 

Just like kerning, tracking is font dependent—one measure does not fit all text sizes and font types.

Perfect typography is certainly the most elusive of all arts. Sculpture in stone alone comes near it in obstinacy, Jan Tschichold, one of the fathers of modern typography used to say. Good letterforms are designed to give a lively, even texture, but careless spacing of letters, lines and words can tear this fabric appart. We at Readymag show maximum deference to typography and our Text widget offers rich options to fine-tune typeset text. Note that playing with the settings gives the best results and good visual judgement is crucial!

Perfect typography is certainly the most elusive of all arts. Sculpture in stone alone comes near it in obstinacy, Jan Tschichold, one of the fathers of modern typography used to say. Good letterforms are designed to give a lively, even texture, but careless spacing of letters, lines and words can tear this fabric appart. We at Readymag show maximum deference to typography and our Text widget offers rich options to fine-tune typeset text. Note that playing with the settings gives the best results and good visual judgement is crucial!

Is your text layout properly arranged?

Сlick the corresponding circle if your project meets the requirements

Check for best alignment

Check for best alignment

Typically centering text works best for short headlines or descriptions, while text blocks with multiple lines look best if aligned left or right. In Readymag, you can adjust alignment from either the Text widget settings or with shortcuts. If you are on Mac, use ⌘ + shift + A to select the current paragraph or ⌘ + A to select the whole text and then apply ⌘ + shift + L to align selected text to the left, ⌘ + shift + C—to the center, or ⌘ + shift + R—to the right. If you use Windows, replace ⌘ with Ctrl and use the same shortcuts.

In some cases, especially in layouts that utilize multiple narrow columns, it makes sense to justify text blocks. In Readymag, justification can be managed through the Text widget settings.

Typically centering text works best for short headlines or descriptions, while text blocks with multiple lines look best if aligned left or right. In Readymag, you can adjust alignment from either the Text widget settings or with shortcuts. If you are on Mac, use ⌘ + shift + A to select the current paragraph or ⌘ + A to select the whole text and then apply ⌘ + shift + L to align selected text to the left, ⌘ + shift + C—to the center, or ⌘ + shift + R—to the right. If you use Windows, replace ⌘ with Ctrl and use the same shortcuts.

In some cases, especially in layouts that utilize multiple narrow columns, it makes sense to justify text blocks. In Readymag, justification can be managed through the Text widget settings.

Tweak ‘rivers’ and loose lines

Tweak ‘rivers’ and loose lines

Check for awkward word spacing:

• ‘Rivers’—visual gaps that run down a paragraph.

• Loose lines—individual lines containing

poorly spaced elements.

 

They require manual adjustment: try reworking copy, using non-breaking space (Opt + Space for Mac and Alt + Space for Windows) or tweaking text tracking.

Check for awkward word spacing:

• ‘Rivers’—visual gaps that run down a paragraph.

• Loose lines—individual lines containing

poorly spaced elements.

 

They require manual adjustment: try reworking copy, using non-breaking space (Opt + Space for Mac and Alt + Space for Windows) or tweaking text tracking.

Fix bad line breaks

Fix bad line breaks

Sometimes strange things happen in paragraphs. If you’re serious about type, you already know that a large part of your typesetting time is spent fixing bad line breaks.

 

These include:

• ‘I’ at the end of lines—it should be pushed down to the

next line. Use the Alt + Space shortcut to insert non-breaking spaces.

• Any repeated words that stack at line

beginnings or endings.

• ‘Pig bristles’—hyphens occasionally falling at the

end of the line. When these anomalies happen, tweak the spacing to shift things around.

Sometimes strange things happen in paragraphs. If you’re serious about type, you already know that a large part of your typesetting time is spent fixing bad line breaks.

 

These include:

• ‘I’ at the end of lines—it should be pushed down to the

next line. Use the Alt + Space shortcut to insert non-breaking spaces.

• Any repeated words that stack at line

beginnings or endings.

• ‘Pig bristles’—hyphens occasionally falling at the

end of the line. When these anomalies happen, tweak the spacing to shift things around.

Find homes for ‘orphans’ and ‘widows’

Find homes for ‘orphans’ and ‘widows’

A ‘widow’ is a very short line at the end of a paragraph or column. They’re considered poor typography because widows leave too much white space between paragraphs or at the bottom of a page. This interrupts the reader. ‘Orphans’ are single words or very short lines appearing at the beginning of a column or a page. This results in poor horizontal alignment at the top of the column or page. Fix them by:

• Reworking the rag or editing the copy.

• Tweak the tracking of the paragraph or line.

• Adjust the text frame width to pull short

words onto previous lines.

A ‘widow’ is a very short line at the end of a paragraph or column. They’re considered poor typography because widows leave too much white space between paragraphs or at the bottom of a page. This interrupts the reader. ‘Orphans’ are single words or very short lines appearing at the beginning of a column or a page. This results in poor horizontal alignment at the top of the column or page. Fix them by:

• Reworking the rag or editing the copy.

• Tweak the tracking of the paragraph or line.

• Adjust the text frame width to pull short

words onto previous lines.

Adjust ragged paragraphs

Adjust ragged paragraphs

When setting type with a ragged margin, pay attention to the shape that the ragged line endings make—a good rag goes in and out from line to line in small increments. Badly ragged paragraphs are simple to remedy though, just use the Alt + Space shortcut to insert non-breaking spaces between words to give your paragraphs a pleasant shape.

When setting type with a ragged margin, pay attention to the shape that the ragged line endings make—a good rag goes in and out from line to line in small increments. Badly ragged paragraphs are simple to remedy though, just use the Alt + Space shortcut to insert non-breaking spaces between words to give your paragraphs a pleasant shape.

Make sure kerning is even and tasteful

Make sure kerning is even and tasteful

Kerning refers to the space between individual characters: set too close together or too far apart, words can become awkward to read. Most of the time, text in Readymag does not need manual kerning, as all digital fonts have kerning tables built-in. But manual kerning may prove necessary with headings, in particular when numbers, italics or punctuation are involved.

To kern the spacing between any two, or more, characters in a word individually, select the characters first, then hold the Alt key and hit the ← or → arrow on the keyboard. You can also use the Tracking option in the Typography palette. A good tip for improving your kerning is to flip type upside-down before adjusting the spacing—to do this, select the desired text and use the R key to rotate it. This way you won’t be distracted by the content, and can focus solely on the visual symmetry.

Kerning refers to the space between individual characters: set too close together or too far apart, words can become awkward to read. Most of the time, text in Readymag does not need manual kerning, as all digital fonts have kerning tables built-in. But manual kerning may prove necessary with headings, in particular when numbers, italics or punctuation are involved.

To kern the spacing between any two, or more, characters in a word individually, select the characters first, then hold the Alt key and hit the ← or → arrow on the keyboard. You can also use the Tracking option in the Typography palette. A good tip for improving your kerning is to flip type upside-down before adjusting the spacing—to do this, select the desired text and use the R key to rotate it. This way you won’t be distracted by the content, and can focus solely on the visual symmetry.

Tweak tracking if necessary

Tweak tracking if necessary

Tracking is another effective method of spatial adjustment, much like kerning, but focused on adjusting space uniformly over a range of characters. Tracking works especially well on headings and subheadings that need to be ultra-legible, affecting the visual density of a word, phrase or paragraph:

• Large text sizes have to be tracked, always in negative

values, because the space between letters gets bigger as the text grows.

• Tracking in positive values is useful when you want to

emphasize words and is commonly used for capitalized text.

 

Just like kerning, tracking is font dependent—one measure does not fit all text sizes and font types.

Tracking is another effective method of spatial adjustment, much like kerning, but focused on adjusting space uniformly over a range of characters. Tracking works especially well on headings and subheadings that need to be ultra-legible, affecting the visual density of a word, phrase or paragraph:

• Large text sizes have to be tracked, always in negative

values, because the space between letters gets bigger as the text grows.

• Tracking in positive values is useful when you want to

emphasize words and is commonly used for capitalized text.

 

Just like kerning, tracking is font dependent—one measure does not fit all text sizes and font types.

Tweak leading if necessary

Tweak leading if necessary

Leading—the space between adjacent lines of type—is a basic rhythmic unit. Correctly spaced lines make it easier for readers to follow type and improves the overall appearance of text. Leading also alters typographic color, which is the density or tone of a composition.

 

Leading—the space between adjacent lines of type—is a basic rhythmic unit. Correctly spaced lines make it easier for readers to follow type and improves the overall appearance of text. Leading also alters typographic color, which is the density or tone of a composition.

 

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