Grid

Intro

introduction

introduction

We use the term “grid” to describe the designer’s basic tool for designing a space of any kind. Depending on the complexity of the final product, either several guidelines or a multi-layer modular system is used. As a rule, in developing a grid, the designer first takes into account all the variables of the layout—typographical elements, illustrations, graphics, photographs. It is advisable to have in mind ahead of time the arrangements of compositions of the future layout and the principles it will follow: peculiarities of the typographical hierarchy, the ways in which graphic elements are to be combined, their interplay with texts, the organization of different types of content on a page.

Essentially, in making the grid, the designer works out the rules and limits to be followed. These rules and limits create, as the work goes forward, a specific impression that often defines and directs the further development of the layout and sometimes leads to unexpected but very welcome results.

A good grid can be compared to the frame on which ivy ascends—a base that gives shape to the space the plant will cover but does not limit its natural growth. Similarly, in working with a properly organized grid, the designer uses as a base a system of harmonious relationships that makes it possible, through the varying of intonation, to create an image that is both regular and expressive, helping the reader grasp the idea while—ideally—enjoying the visual experience.

 

We use the term “grid” to describe the designer’s basic tool for designing a space of any kind. Depending on the complexity of the final product, either several guidelines or a multi-layer modular system is used. As a rule, in developing a grid, the designer first takes into account all the variables of the layout—typographical elements, illustrations, graphics, photographs. It is advisable to have in mind ahead of time the arrangements of compositions of the future layout and the principles it will follow: peculiarities of the typographical hierarchy, the ways in which graphic elements are to be combined, their interplay with texts, the organization of different types of content on a page.

Essentially, in making the grid, the designer works out the rules and limits to be followed. These rules and limits create, as the work goes forward, a specific impression that often defines and directs the further development of the layout and sometimes leads to unexpected but very welcome results.

A good grid can be compared to the frame on which ivy ascends—a base that gives shape to the space the plant will cover but does not limit its natural growth. Similarly, in working with a properly organized grid, the designer uses as a base a system of harmonious relationships that makes it possible, through the varying of intonation, to create an image that is both regular and expressive, helping the reader grasp the idea while—ideally—enjoying the visual experience.